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Sex Offender Notification
Overview

The Saint Paul Police Department is releasing this information pursuant to Minnesota Statute 244.052 which authorizes law enforcement agencies to inform the public of a sex offender's release from prison, or a secure treatment facility, when that agency believes that the release of information will enhance public safety.

Sex offender notification laws differ from state to state. Notification about sex offenders released into the community became law in Minnesota in January, 1997. The information contained here pertains to sex offenders released into the city of Saint Paul. This information is also communicated directly to the affected communities at meetings that give citizens the opportunity to learn about the notification law, about the offender being released, the offender's rights and restrictions, and about what law-abiding people can do to make themselves, and their families, safer. These meetings also give attendees an opportunity to ask questions.

The materials contained within this site are not meant to be exhaustive; however, they do provide information about the notification law and about offenders released into the local community.

If you live outside of Saint Paul, Minnesota, please contact your local law enforcement agency about the community notification process in your city.

Illegal activities against a sex offender will be treated as such. These activities could also jeopardize the notification law.


Overview of the Community Notification Act
Legislative Findings and Purpose
"The legislature finds that if members of the public are provided adequate notice and information about a sex offender who has been or is about to be released from custody and who lives or will live in or near their neighborhood, the community can develop constructive plans to prepare themselves and their children for the offender's release."

Assessment of Risk Level
The public risk posed by a sex offender about to be released is assessed by a committee of experts. The offender is given a risk level. Information about the offender, including their risk level, is sent to the law enforcement agency having primary jurisdiction over the area in which the offender plans to reside. The level of risk posed by the offender determines to whom law enforcement may disclose information.
Scope of Notification
  • Level 1 - Law enforcement may notify:
    • Other law enforcement agencies
    • Any victims of, or witnesses to, the offense committed by the offender
  • Level 2 - In addition to Level 1 notifications, law enforcement may notify:
    • Schools and daycares
    • Establishments and organizations that primarily serve individuals likely to be victimized by the offender
  • Level 3 - In addition to Level 2 notifications, law enforcement may notify:
    • Other members of the community whom the offender is likely to encounter

About Community Notification Policy

Now for the first time in Minnesota, there is a law that will provide each member of the community with needed information about released sex offenders.

Until now the public has been left largely in the dark as to who these people are and where they go when they leave prison. This ignorance has sometimes had tragic consequences, not only for prior and future victims of the released offender, but sometimes for the offender as well.

Minnesota law now provides the opportunity for the local law enforcement agency to provide its community with the kind information it needs to make good decisions with regard to the safety and welfare of its citizens and their children.

The soon-to-be released sex offender is required, by law, to register with local authorities, and to keep authorities apprised of any subsequent changes in residence. This information is kept and maintained on a computer system by the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension. It provides law enforcement agencies with essential information as to the nature and whereabouts of certain convicted criminals who reside in their jurisdictions.

In 1996, the Minnesota Legislature passed a law requiring every law enforcement agency in the state to have policies for disseminating information about the location and residence of certain sex offenders to the public. This law reflects growing national awareness of the problems communities have faced because they did not have adequate information concerning sex offenders in their midst. On May 17, 1996, President Clinton signed a similar new federal law, which has been widely discussed in the press under the title "Megan's Law." The federal law is not as comprehensive as the Minnesota law, but shows that the need for such a law is felt throughout the entire country.

The Minnesota law requires every law enforcement agency in the state to adopt a policy by January 1, 1997, which is the same or similar to the model policy presented here.

The Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) was directed by this legislation to develop a model policy for law enforcement agencies to follow when they disclose information on sex offenders to the public. According to the legislation:

"... The model policy must be designed to further the objectives of providing adequate notice to the community concerning sex offenders who are or will be residing in the neighborhood and of helping community members develop constructive plans to prepare themselves and their children for residing near these sex offenders."

To develop this model policy, the Legislature directed the board to consult with representatives of:

"...the Bureau of Criminal Apprehension, The Minnesota Chiefs of Police Association, the Minnesota Sheriffs Association, the Minnesota Association of Women Police, The Minnesota Sex Crimes Investigators Association, The Minnesota Police and Peace Officer Association, The Minnesota Institute of Community Policing, the County Attorneys Association, the Commissioner of Corrections, local corrections agencies, the state Public Defender, sex offender treatment professionals, victims groups, and interested members of the public."

To this end, the POST Board convened representatives of these groups and began to meet in April, 1996. Detective Robert Shilling of the Seattle Police Department, a nationally recognized authority in the area of community notification, was brought to the Twin Cities in early May to share his experience with the committee and to answer questions from the public and the press. Detective Shilling had earlier been instrumental in helping to get the Minnesota community notification legislation passed.

It is important to understand that community notification is basically an educational process that takes place in two distinct phases: pre-release of the offender, and post-release.

The soon-to-be-released offender is assigned one of three risk categories by a committee convened at the correctional facility. This committee is made up of professionals from corrections and law enforcement, sex-offender treatment, and victim's services. This assessment is based on the type and severity of the crime the individual was convicted of, whether that crime involved violence, the prisoner's general amenability to treatment, and overall psychological condition. Risk Level 1 represents low-risk (i.e., least likely to repeat offenses); Level 2 is medium risk; and Level 3 is most likely to repeate offenses.

Two separate "fact sheets" will be sent to the law enforcement agency about each offender.

The Saint Paul Police Department will receive-a packet of information from the (DOC) about an individual's before the release is to take place. This information will include the DOC's recommendation of risk level. Supporting documentation to explain this determination is also sent. If your police department doesn't agree with DOC's recommendation, there is an appeals process which it can initiate.

Two fact-sheets will be part of this release information. One fact sheet is detailed information on the offender to be used by the agency itself or to be shared with other agencies. This fact-sheet will include non-public information. The other is a one page offender fact-sheet with a photograph of the offender, that can be distributed to the public. This may be as freely duplicated and distributed as the agency desires.

Risk Level determines what kind of notification is to take place.

It is important to understand that community notification under Minnesota law encompasses individuals of all three risk categories. This is what sets Minnesota's community notification law apart from similar laws of other states. Each department's notification policy must address the question of how individuals at each risk category are to be handled.

Whenever possible, a notification plan will be prepared by the Chief Law Enforcement Officer at least 14 days prior to the release of the individual offender.

The Chief Law Enforcement Officer of each agency determines what kind of notification should take place in a specific instance, and how it is to be done, based on guidelines set in the policy.

Thorough community notification, including a community meeting, should be done for most Level 3 offenders. The model policy requires local law enforcement agencies to document if a meeting is not held in a level-three release. (There may be situations, such as, the offender relocating within the same jurisdiction, where another meeting may not be warranted.)

For Level 1 releases, law enforcement agencies share information with other law enforcement agencies and with victims and witnesses.

With Level 2 offenders, the policy suggests that schools and daycare providers be notified, along with establishments and organizations that primarily serve individuals likely to be victimized.

Part of community notification is aimed at ensuring that the rights of the offender be safeguarded. The department policy must address the offender's right to be free from harassment or criminal acts committed by community residents because of the notification process. Abuse of this information by threatening, harassing or intimidating registered offenders may be a crime, and will not be tolerated. Such abuses could potentially end the ability of law enforcement to do these notifications. The only person who wins if community notification ends is the sex offender since many of these offenders derive their power from the opportunity that secrecy provides them.


Notification of Release in Minnesota - Level 3

In addition to level two notifications (schools and day cares as well as establishments and organizations that primarily serve individuals likely to be victimized by the offender), law enforcement may notify other members of the community whom the offender is likely to encounter.

The Saint Paul Police Department is releasing the following information pursuant to Minnesota Statutes 244.052 which authorizes law enforcement agencies to inform the public of a sex offender's release from prison, or a secure treatment facility, when that Saint Paul Police Department believes that the release of information will enhance public safety.

The individuals who appear on this notification have been convicted of Criminal Sexual Conduct or other offense which requires registration with law enforcement pursuant to Minnesota Statutes 243.166.

These offenders are not wanted by the police at this time and have served the sentence imposed on them by the court. This notification is not intended to increase fear in the community. It is the belief of law enforcement that an informed public is a safer public.

Not the Saint Paul Police Department, the supervising release agent, nor the Minnesota Department of Corrections may direct where the offender does or does not reside, nor can these agencies direct where he works or goes to school. The risk level of these offenders has been determined based largely on their previous criminal behavior and their potential to repeat offenses.

Convicted sex offenders have always been released to live in our communities, but it was not until passage of the Registration Act that law enforcement had an ability to know the residence, or track their moves after their initial release. Since the passage of the Community Notification Act law enforcement may share information about many of these offenders with the public. Abuse of this information to threaten, harass, or intimidate registered offenders may be a crime, and will not be tolerated. Such abuses could potentially end the ability of law enforcement to do these notifications. The only person who wins if community notification ends is the sex offender since many of these offenders derive their power from the opportunity that secrecy provides them.

The Saint Paul Police Department is available to help you by providing you and your family with useful information on personal safety. To obtain this information, please call (651) 266-5685. If you want to report non-emergency criminal activity please call (651) 291-1111. Dial 9-1-1 for in-progress crimes or emergencies.

If you live outside of Saint Paul, Minnesota, please contact your local law enforcement agency about the community notification process in your city.


List of Level 3 Sex Offenders in Saint Paul

For information on Level 3 Sex Offenders residing in Saint Paul, please visit the Saint Paul page of Minnesota Department of Corrections Sex Offender Website.


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